Archive for the ‘ General ’ Category

Tenant Background Credit Check for Landlords

Tenant Check

2 EASY STEPS TO ORDERING CREDIT AND BACKGROUND REPORTS ON PROSPECTIVE TENANTS

Step 1: Become a member – Click Here

 Step 2: Order reports: Order form, Signed Applications, and Picture ID – Click Here

 Tenant Credit Check $19.95: Decision credit report, or with an on-site inspection full consumer credit check.

 Landlord Preferred $29.95: Social Security Verification, Eviction Report, Previous Name and Address Verification, Birth Date, Employment History and Verification*, Public Records and Civil Judgments, Liens, Bankruptcy, Foreclosures, Consumer trades, Previous Rental History, Previous and Current Credit Information, Previous Inquiries, FICO/Beacon Score dependent on On-Site Inspection

 Landlord Comprehensive $39.95: Criminal Record Search, Sex Offender Search, Social Security Verification, Eviction Report, Previous Name and Address Verification, Birth Date, Employment History and Verification*, Public Records and Civil Judgments, Liens, Bankruptcy, Foreclosures, Consumer trades, Previous Rental History, Previous and Current Credit Information, Previous Inquiries, FICO/Beacon Score dependent on On-Site Inspection

 Landlord Complete $60.00: Criminal Record Search, Sex Offender Search, Police Record Search, Separate Bankruptcy Search, Second Criminal Record Database search, Social Security Verification, Eviction Report, Previous Name and Address Verification, Birth Date, Employment History and Verification*, Public Records and Civil Judgments, Liens, Bankruptcy, Foreclosures, Consumer trades,Previous Rental History, Previous and Current Credit Information, Previous Inquiries, FICO/Beacon Score dependent on On-Site Inspection

 Comprehensive Background Bureau $22.50: Criminal Record Search, Sex Offender Search, Social Security Verification, Eviction Report, Previous Name and Address Verification, Birth Date, Public Records, Bankruptcy

 Name and Address Identity – Social Security Number Identification – Previous Name and Address Verification – Birth Date – Spousal Information – Employment History and Verification – Public Records and Civil Judgments- Liens and Bankruptcy Reports – Previous Rental History – Consumer Trade Reports – Payment and Loan History – Previous and Current Credit Information – Professional and Reference Verification – Previous Inquiries – FICO/Beacon Score and Summar

Accurate Credit Bureau

Accurate Credit Bureau is a Landlord and Employer Friendly Service We provide inexpensive and convenient Applicant Credit Reports, Tenant and Employment Screening, Tenant and Employment Credit Reporting, and Tenant and Employment Reference Verification hassle free NO SET UP FEES NO MEMBERSHIP DUES!

I’ve come to collect the rent mug

http://www.cafepress.com/mf/17636969/collect-the-rent_mugs?productId=108172668

Tenant Screening for Landlords Property Managers Real Estate Agents

Now renter credit reports and eviction reports plus criminal background checks are available to all landlords and property owners. A key to picking out the right renter is to have quality tenant background check information to help you make your decision. At Accurate Credit Bureau landlords may download free rental agreements and rental leases plus other Landlord related forms and applications. Important Decisions Demand Accurate Information.

Landlords Collect Applications and Screen Tenants

The best way to deal with bad tenants is to make sure they never move in! Try to accept the most-qualified applicant who is also the best fit for your property, but be careful not to discriminate.

  • Collect information via professional rental applications
  • Ensure total income of all tenants is 2-3x monthly rent
  • Ask their two former landlords, “Would you rent to them again?”
  • Run a tenant credit check to determine total debt and late payment history

    For more tenant screening advice and help see Accurate Credit Bureau

    IMPORTANT DECISIONS DEMAND ACCURATE INFORMATIOIN

Accurate Credit Bureau Landlord Advice Tenant Security Deposit

Deadline for Returning Security Deposits by State

The following list is a guide to help landlords determine when the security deposit must be returned to the tenant. As a reminder to all landlords, you should be performing a walk through prior to the tenant moving as this will prevent arguments as to the condition of the unit at move out.

Alabama 35 days after termination of tenancy and delivery of possession
Alaska 14 days if the tenant gives proper notice to terminate tenancy; 30 days if the tenant does not give proper notice
Arizona 14 days
Arkansas 30 days
California Three weeks
Colorado One month, unless lease agreement specifies longer period of time (which may be no more than 60 days); 72 hours (not counting weekends or holidays) if a hazardous condition involving gas equipment requires tenant to vacate
Connecticut 30 days, or within 15 days of receiving tenant’s forwarding address, whichever is later
Delaware 20 days
District of Columbia 45 days
Florida 15 to 60 days depending on whether tenant disputes deductions
Georgia One month
Hawaii 14 days
Idaho 21 days, or up to 30 days if landlord and tenant agree
Illinois For properties with five or more units, 30 to 45 days, depending on whether tenant disputes deductions or if statement and receipts are furnished
Indiana 45 days
Iowa 30 days
Kansas 30 days
Kentucky 30-60 days, depending on whether tenant disputes deductions
Louisiana One month
Maine 30 days (if written rental agreement) or 21 days (if tenancy at will)
Maryland 45 days
Massachusetts 30 days
Michigan 30 days
Minnesota Three weeks after tenant leaves, and landlord receives mailing address; five days if tenant must leave due to building condemnation
Mississippi 45 days
Missouri 30 days
Montana 30 days (10 days if no deductions)
Nebraska 14 days
Nevada 30 days
New Hampshire 30 days; for shared facilities, if the deposit is more than 30 days’ rent, landlord must provide written agreement acknowledging receipt and specifying when deposit will be returned — if no written agreement, 20 days after tenant vacates
New Jersey 30 days; five days in case of fire, flood, condemnation, or evacuation; does not apply to owner-occupied building with two or fewer units where tenant fails to provide 30 days’ written notice to landlord invoking provisions of act
New Mexico 30 days
New York Reasonable time
North Carolina 30 days
North Dakota 30 days
Ohio 30 days
Oklahoma 30 days
Oregon 31 days
Pennsylvania 30 days
Rhode Island 20 days
South Carolina 30 days
South Dakota Two weeks to return entire deposit or a portion, and supply reasons for withholding; 45 days for a written, itemized accounting, if tenant requests it
Tennessee No statutory deadline to return; 10 days to itemize
Texas 30 days
Utah 30 days, or within 15 days of receiving tenant’s forwarding address, whichever is later, but if there is damage to the premises, 30 days
Vermont 14 days
Virginia 45 days
Washington 14 days
West Virginia No statutory deadline
Wisconsin 21 days
Wyoming 30 days, or within 15 days of receiving tenant’s forwarding address, whichever is later; 60 days if there is damage

Accurate Credit Bureau Landlord Legal Questions Rental Lease and Rental Agreement

A written agreement will define the obligations and rights of the tenant and the landlord. A tenant lease agreement or rental agreement should include:

The names of the tenants and the landlords
The address of the rental unit, including the apartment number
The term of the tenant’s occupancy
The rent amount the tenant will pay
The amount of the security deposit
Whether the tenant may have pets
Whether parking is available
Whether the landlord or the tenant pays for utilities
Whether subletting is allowed
How many people may live in the rental unit
The reasons the landlord may enter the unit
The party responsible for paying the legal fees when a dispute arises
Rental and lease agreement forms are usually available at office supply stores and in books about landlord and tenant rights, or in FindLaw’s form store.

What provisions are prohibited in residential rental agreements and leases?

State laws vary, but rental agreements and leases may not contain certain provisions. The most common prohibited provisions include:

The exclusion of tenants based on race, color, national origin, or sex
The prohibition of children, unless the property is a senior housing facility
A tenant waiver of the right to sue the landlord
A tenant waiver of the right to a refund of a security deposit
A waiver of the landlord’s duty to keep the premises habitable
In some states, when a landlord includes provisions prohibited by law the lease or rental agreement is invalidated. The tenant may be able to recover damages and attorney fees if the landlord was aware that the provisions violated the law.

Is there a difference between a rental agreement and a lease?

Yes. A rental agreement, or a periodic or month-to-month agreement, is a written contract for a short-term tenancy. Most rental agreements are for 30-days, but can be for other periods. With a short-term tenancy, the landlord may also change the rental terms, such as the rent amount, by providing proper notice to the tenant.

A lease agreement, or a fixed-term lease, is a written contract for a term of tenancy that is usually six-months or a year. For the term of the tenancy, the rights and obligations defined in the tenant lease agreement cannot change until the term expires or upon the tenant’s agreement in writing. When the lease expires, the parties may create a new lease, the landlord may decline to renew the lease, or if the tenant remains in the rental unit, the tenancy automatically becomes a month-to-month agreement.

Are there limits on how much a landlord can charge for a security deposit? What can a landlord use a security deposit for?

In at least half of the states, a landlord may not require the tenant to pay more than one to two times the rent for a security deposit. In many states, the landlord must place the security deposit in a separate account, and in some cases, the landlord must even pay the tenant interest on the deposit.

A landlord may charge the tenant a security deposit to cover the cost of unpaid rent, damage, and for cleaning dirt and grime beyond normal wear and tear. Once the tenant moves out, the landlord can use the deposit to make repairs that did not result from ordinary wear and tear. A landlord, for instance, may not charge a tenant to replace a worn hallway carpet, but can charge the tenant for the cost of fixing large holes in the wall. The landlord must return any unused portion of the security deposit within the time specified by a state’s guidelines.

Under what circumstances can a landlord raise the rent or evict a tenant from a rent-controlled property?

Rent control laws limit the amount a landlord can charge for rent and the reasons for terminating a tenancy. California, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, and the District of Columbia are the only states with rent control laws. Rent control boards, either elected by voters or appointed by the mayor or the city council, determine the amount of rental increases. Rent controlled properties are usually limited to older buildings built before a specific time.

Rent control ordinances allow a landlord to increase the rent under certain conditions. The most common include:

Annual rent increase: the rent control board sets the amount, usually a percentage, that a landlord can increase the rent each year
Increased operating costs: a landlord may request the board approve a rent increase when the cost of maintenance or property taxes have risen
“Vacancy decontrol”: when a tenant vacates the property or renews the lease, a landlord may raise the rent as much as allowed by a specified percentage or by as much as the landlord determines
Rent control ordinances also control when a landlord can evict a tenant. Typically, ordinances allow eviction under a few circumstances:

The tenant violates a tenant lease agreement or rental agreement term, such as the failure to pay rent
The landlord plans to live in the unit
The tenant is a nuisance or engages in illegal activity
The property will no longer be used as a rental
A landlord may not evict a tenant unless there is a legal reason for doing so.