Archive for the ‘ Landlord Tenant Law Massachusetts ’ Category

Landlords – Don’t be that GUY!

http://www.wfaa.com/news/local/dallas-county/junk-landlord-investigated-by-news-8-evicting-hundreds-of-tenants/329044843
Accurate Credit Bureau

Accurate Credit Bureau Landlord Feedback

“You guys are very efficient. Thanks for the speedy response yesterday.
I have a new applicant to run a credit check on. Attached please find all
the necessary information.
Please advise if anything else is needed.
Thanks”
Rudolph J.

Accurate Credit Bureau Feedback

Jeff, many thanks for processing this for me in record time.  It was most helpful, AND the apartment was rented!
Marrgo
For tenant screening and landlord services see Accurate Credit Bureau.
Important Decisions Demand Accurate Information!

Landlord Laws Laws Laws

Seattle landlord wonders why he can’t choose the ‘nice and clean’ renters

Yikes! Landlord Nightmare!

http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-inglewood-mayor-daughter-attack-20160615-snap-story.html

Landlord – Accurate Credit Bureau

noun
1. a person or organization that owns and leases apartments to others.
2. a person who owns and leases land, buildings, etc.
3. a person who owns or runs an inn, lodging house, etc.
4. a landowner.
Landlord assistance

Be careful when renting to celebs…

http://www.india.com/showbiz/rapper-tyga-sued-again-by-landlord-1052614/

Landlord Help – Tenant Eviction Process

A landlord can’t begin an eviction lawsuit without first legally terminating the tenancy. This means giving the tenant written notice, as specified in the state’s termination statute. If the tenant doesn’t move (or reform — for example, by paying the rent or finding a new home for the dog), you can then file a lawsuit to evict.

State laws set out very detailed requirements to end a tenancy. Different types of termination notices are required for different types of situations, and each state has its own procedures as to how termination notices and eviction papers must be written and delivered (“served”).

Although terminology varies somewhat from state to state, there are basically three types of termination notices for tenancies that landlords terminate due to tenant misbehavior:

  • Pay Rent or Quit Notices are typically used when the tenant has not paid the rent. They give the tenant a few days (three to five in most states) to pay the rent or move out (“quit”).
  • Cure or Quit Notices are typically given after a tenant violates a term or condition of the lease or rental agreement, such as a no-pets clause or the requirement to refrain from making excessive noise. Usually, the tenant has a set amount of time in which to correct, or “cure,” the violation. A tenant who fails to do so must move or face the possibility of an eviction lawsuit.
  • Unconditional Quit Notices are the harshest of all. They order the tenant to vacate the premises with no chance to pay the rent or correct a lease or rental agreement violation. In most states, unconditional quit notices are allowed only when the tenant has:
    • repeatedly violated a significant lease or rental agreement clause
    • been late with the rent on more than one occasion
    • seriously damaged the premises, or
    • engaged in serious illegal activity, such as drug dealing on the premises.

However, in some states, landlords may use Unconditional Quit Notices for transgressions that would require Pay or Quit Notices or Cure or Quit Notices in other, more tenant-friendly states. In these strict states, landlords may extend second chances if they wish, but no law requires them to do so.

Even after receiving notice, some tenants won’t leave or fix the lease or rental agreement violation. If you still want the tenant to leave, you must begin an unlawful detainer lawsuit by properly serving the tenant with a summons and complaint for eviction.

Notice for Termination Without Cause

Landlords may usually use a 30-Day or 60-Day Notice to Vacate to end a month-to-month tenancy when the tenant has not done anything wrong. Many rent control cities, however, do not allow this; they require the landlord to prove a legally recognized reason for eviction (“just cause”) of tenants.

Tenant Defenses

If the tenant decides to mount a defense, it may add weeks — even months — to the process. A tenant can point to mistakes in the notice or the eviction complaint, or improper service (delivery) of either, in an attempt to delay or dismiss the case. The way that you have conducted business with the tenant may also affect the outcome: If your rental unit is uninhabitable or the tenant thinks you are retaliating, this may excuse or shift attention away from the tenant’s wrongdoing and diminish your chances of victory.

Removal of the Tenant

If you win the Eviction (unlawful detainer lawsuit), you will get a judgment for possession of the property and/or for unpaid rent. But you can’t just move the tenant and his things out onto the sidewalk — trying to remove a tenant yourself can cause a lot of trouble.

Typically, you must give the court judgment to a local law enforcement officer (sheriff or marshal), along with a fee that is charged to the tenant as part of your costs to bring suit. The sheriff or marshal gives the tenant a notice that the officer will be back within a number of days to physically remove the tenant if he isn’t gone by then.

Rationale for the Rules

Landlords often chafe at the detailed rules that they must follow. There is a reason, however, why most states have insisted on strict compliance. First of all, an eviction case is, relatively speaking, a very fast legal procedure. (How many other civil cases are over and done with after a few weeks?) The price to pay for this streamlined treatment is unwavering adherence to the rules.

Second, what’s at stake here — a tenant’s home — is arguably more important than a civil case concerning money or business. Consequently, legislators have been extra careful to see to it that the tenant gets adequate notice and an opportunity to respond.

For more information on the tenant eviction process or other landlord help see Accurate Credit Bureau

Landlords Collect Applications and Screen Tenants

The best way to deal with bad tenants is to make sure they never move in! Try to accept the most-qualified applicant who is also the best fit for your property, but be careful not to discriminate.

  • Collect information via professional rental applications
  • Ensure total income of all tenants is 2-3x monthly rent
  • Ask their two former landlords, “Would you rent to them again?”
  • Run a tenant credit check to determine total debt and late payment history

    For more tenant screening advice and help see Accurate Credit Bureau

    IMPORTANT DECISIONS DEMAND ACCURATE INFORMATIOIN

New Landlord Bills

Energy Efficiency Improvement Act

A bipartisan bill co-sponsored by swing-state senators Rob Portman of Ohio and Jeanne Shaheen of New Hampshire, this legislation took some modest steps toward improving energy efficiency in buildings. In particular, the legislation created a voluntary program called Tenant Star, which provides incentives for landlords to make spaces they lease in commercial buildings energy efficient. The proposal is modeled after the Energy Star program, which does the same in newly built buildings. The bill, which passed both the House and Senate by voice vote, also contains a provision that exempted some water heaters from federal energy efficiency standards.