Posts Tagged ‘ Texas landlord ’

Landlords – Don’t be that GUY!

http://www.wfaa.com/news/local/dallas-county/junk-landlord-investigated-by-news-8-evicting-hundreds-of-tenants/329044843
Accurate Credit Bureau

Accurate Credit Bureau Feedback

Jeff, many thanks for processing this for me in record time.  It was most helpful, AND the apartment was rented!
Marrgo
For tenant screening and landlord services see Accurate Credit Bureau.
Important Decisions Demand Accurate Information!

Landlords Check Your Prosepective Tenants

Tenant Check

2 EASY STEPS TO ORDERING CREDIT AND BACKGROUND REPORTS ON PROSPECTIVE TENANTS

Step 1: Become a member – Click Here

 Step 2: Order reports: Order form, Signed Applications, and Picture ID – Click Here

 Tenant Credit Check $19.95: Decision credit report, or with an on-site inspection full consumer credit check.

 Landlord Preferred $29.95: Social Security Verification, Eviction Report, Previous Name and Address Verification, Birth Date, Employment History and Verification*, Public Records and Civil Judgments, Liens, Bankruptcy, Foreclosures, Consumer trades, Previous Rental History, Previous and Current Credit Information, Previous Inquiries, FICO/Beacon Score dependent on On-Site Inspection

 Landlord Comprehensive $39.95: Criminal Record Search, Sex Offender Search, Social Security Verification, Eviction Report, Previous Name and Address Verification, Birth Date, Employment History and Verification*, Public Records and Civil Judgments, Liens, Bankruptcy, Foreclosures, Consumer trades, Previous Rental History, Previous and Current Credit Information, Previous Inquiries, FICO/Beacon Score dependent on On-Site Inspection

 Landlord Complete $60.00: Criminal Record Search, Sex Offender Search, Police Record Search, Separate Bankruptcy Search, Second Criminal Record Database search, Social Security Verification, Eviction Report, Previous Name and Address Verification, Birth Date, Employment History and Verification*, Public Records and Civil Judgments, Liens, Bankruptcy, Foreclosures, Consumer trades,Previous Rental History, Previous and Current Credit Information, Previous Inquiries, FICO/Beacon Score dependent on On-Site Inspection

 Comprehensive Background Bureau $22.50: Criminal Record Search, Sex Offender Search, Social Security Verification, Eviction Report, Previous Name and Address Verification, Birth Date, Public Records, Bankruptcy

Landlord – Accurate Credit Bureau

noun
1. a person or organization that owns and leases apartments to others.
2. a person who owns and leases land, buildings, etc.
3. a person who owns or runs an inn, lodging house, etc.
4. a landowner.
Landlord assistance

It’s Floodin’ Down in Texas – Accurate Credit Bureau – and a tree fell on our roof!!!

Landlord Tenant Screening Process – Accurate Credit Bureau

If you are a new landlord, or maybe you’ve had a string of bad luck with tenants, you should establish a quality tenant screening process. Be sure to keep your expectations realistic. Not everyone is going to look perfect on paper, but you can still save time, headaches and money by following some of these tips.

Pre-Screening – If you are advertising and screening the applicants on your own – make sure your standards are clear up front. This helps weed out potential tenants who will waste your time: you only want to show and screen those who are qualified. Explain if you accept pets or short term rentals. Learn their backstory. Get their move details. Have them fill out a professional rental application and charge a tenant screening fee. You can see various landlord packages at Accurate Credit Bureau.

When are they looking to move? How many people will be living in the unit? Where will they be working? Where did they live previously? If they are local, why are they looking to move? If they have an issue with their current place, it will help you figure out if that issue will also continue in your unit – not enough space, or parking is needed, or they want to get a dog.

If you decide to deny a tenant, you want to be able to clearly explain why, and be sure there are no issues with discrimination. You never want to be on the receiving end of a Fair Housing suit. Be sure you know the protected classes, and that you do not discriminate in advertising, showing practices or by denying applications based on race, color, religion, national origin, sex, disability, and familial status. Once you’ve decided to move forward, the next tips will help you through the formal tenant screening process.

Income – Obviously, the top question is can the tenant afford the rent? Generally, a good rule is for the tenant or tenants to have a combined monthly gross income of three times the monthly rent. If the prospective tenants don’t meet that minimum then you have to decide if you will accept co-signers. Co-signers will need to complete the full application process as well, and remember, they not only need to make up for the income difference on the rent for your property, but also be able to afford their other commitments as well.

Employment Verification – Do they have a job? How long have they been in their current position? Is there relative stability in their position? Do your due diligence, though. For those with established jobs, get their paystubs to verify the income they told you on their application is accurate.
You can also request permission to contact current and past employers. You can have this on the free rental application. You can ask about their dates of employment, salary and probability of continued employment (for current employees) or would you rehire (for past employees). Remember, the HR department can only answer certain questions, so keep it general.

Landlord References – Landlord references are helpful for many reasons. For one, it helps to hear from other landlords if your applicants were good tenants. Especially when those tenants have pets, knowing the previous landlord had no issues eases the mind. It is also helpful if your applicants don’t have excellent credit. Landlord references help gain insight as to whether at a minimum they pay their rent on time.

Credit Screening – This one is a must, but of course doesn’t have to be the sole indicator as to whether you accept an applicant. If the applicants’ credit is less than perfect, ask them to explain. Sometimes life happens and credit gets messy. Issues such as job loss, divorce, medical issues and high student loans can all negatively affect a credit score, but it doesn’t mean that person won’t pay their rent. Determine up front if you will accept those applicants. Using the additional information gained from the above screening items can help you look at the full picture.

Run a criminal record report and tenant background check.

Having an established tenant screening process will help with this rental cycle, as well as many more to come. Future tenants will respect the professionalism, and it will likely lead you to quality tenants. It never hurts to trust your intuition as well. Be up front with potential renters. Fine tune your pre-screening to save time with the formal screening. A thorough and transparent screening process should lead both parties to have a less turbulent 12 months and beyond. See more at Accurate Credit Bureau.

Accurate Credit Bureau Landlord Advice Tenant Security Deposit

Deadline for Returning Security Deposits by State

The following list is a guide to help landlords determine when the security deposit must be returned to the tenant. As a reminder to all landlords, you should be performing a walk through prior to the tenant moving as this will prevent arguments as to the condition of the unit at move out.

Alabama 35 days after termination of tenancy and delivery of possession
Alaska 14 days if the tenant gives proper notice to terminate tenancy; 30 days if the tenant does not give proper notice
Arizona 14 days
Arkansas 30 days
California Three weeks
Colorado One month, unless lease agreement specifies longer period of time (which may be no more than 60 days); 72 hours (not counting weekends or holidays) if a hazardous condition involving gas equipment requires tenant to vacate
Connecticut 30 days, or within 15 days of receiving tenant’s forwarding address, whichever is later
Delaware 20 days
District of Columbia 45 days
Florida 15 to 60 days depending on whether tenant disputes deductions
Georgia One month
Hawaii 14 days
Idaho 21 days, or up to 30 days if landlord and tenant agree
Illinois For properties with five or more units, 30 to 45 days, depending on whether tenant disputes deductions or if statement and receipts are furnished
Indiana 45 days
Iowa 30 days
Kansas 30 days
Kentucky 30-60 days, depending on whether tenant disputes deductions
Louisiana One month
Maine 30 days (if written rental agreement) or 21 days (if tenancy at will)
Maryland 45 days
Massachusetts 30 days
Michigan 30 days
Minnesota Three weeks after tenant leaves, and landlord receives mailing address; five days if tenant must leave due to building condemnation
Mississippi 45 days
Missouri 30 days
Montana 30 days (10 days if no deductions)
Nebraska 14 days
Nevada 30 days
New Hampshire 30 days; for shared facilities, if the deposit is more than 30 days’ rent, landlord must provide written agreement acknowledging receipt and specifying when deposit will be returned — if no written agreement, 20 days after tenant vacates
New Jersey 30 days; five days in case of fire, flood, condemnation, or evacuation; does not apply to owner-occupied building with two or fewer units where tenant fails to provide 30 days’ written notice to landlord invoking provisions of act
New Mexico 30 days
New York Reasonable time
North Carolina 30 days
North Dakota 30 days
Ohio 30 days
Oklahoma 30 days
Oregon 31 days
Pennsylvania 30 days
Rhode Island 20 days
South Carolina 30 days
South Dakota Two weeks to return entire deposit or a portion, and supply reasons for withholding; 45 days for a written, itemized accounting, if tenant requests it
Tennessee No statutory deadline to return; 10 days to itemize
Texas 30 days
Utah 30 days, or within 15 days of receiving tenant’s forwarding address, whichever is later, but if there is damage to the premises, 30 days
Vermont 14 days
Virginia 45 days
Washington 14 days
West Virginia No statutory deadline
Wisconsin 21 days
Wyoming 30 days, or within 15 days of receiving tenant’s forwarding address, whichever is later; 60 days if there is damage